triathlon strength training improve swim bike run

Strength training is an important part of any balanced workout program and for a triathlete, this is especially true. All three sports of swimming, cycling, and running are strenuous activities that require careful attention to muscle balance to prevent injury and promote optimal performance. When you are consistently training in all three, strength training takes on a completely new component of importance.

Strength training for triathlon

Training for a triathlon is usually pretty time-intensive to gain the fitness level and specificity you need for each leg of your race. While lifting is a must, efficiency can help maximize your results without feeling too overwhelmed by your routine. (Plus, it’s nice to have time for other things in your life.) Find strength exercises that address multiple muscle groups at once, promote muscular endurance and stability, and ultimately give you the power you need.

Why you need a good lifting routine

Build muscular endurance for that extra “oomph” at the end of your race and power throughout. You don’t need to have bulging biceps to gain benefits either. Rather, you will maximize your muscles' reserves for pushing yourself to that next level. Plus, you’ll prevent injury. If you are intimidated by gyms or don’t have the time, consider a home gym set up. Ultimately, go for lower weight and higher repetition to gain endurance.

All-in-One Exercises

These moves will focus on typical problem areas that are common with all three sports. Complete 15-20 repetitions of each exercise for 2-3 sets. Your whole routine should take 20-30 minutes. When possible, do it 2-3 times per week.

Plank Row

  1. Choose light dumbbells.
  2. Get in a plank position on your hands with the elbows straight but not locked out or hyper-extended.
  3. With the core tight, bend one elbow as you extend the arm back and squeeze the shoulder blades together.
  4. Alternate between sides.

Keep your arms tucked in close to your side. Choose a weight that is challenging while still keeping good form.

plank row dumbbell exercise beach outdoor workout

Side Plank With Hip Abduction

  1. Get in a side plank on your elbow; make sure your body is in one line with no sagging at the hips.
  2. Lift the top leg straight up toward the ceiling.
  3. Keep the toes pointing forward toward the wall.
  4. Modify your knee on the lower leg if needed.
  5. Switch to the other side when complete.

You should feel this exercise in your obliques and glutes. You can add an ankle weight for extra resistance.

side plank core exercise workout

Prone Swimmers (Superman)

  1. Lie on your stomach with the arms outstretched in front of you.
  2. Lift one leg and the opposite arm off the ground 2-3 inches and hold 1-2 seconds.
  3. Focus on squeezing your glutes and shoulder blades as you lift.
  4. Alternate between sides.

You can progress to holding light weights in your hands when possible. You can also try doing this move on a yoga ball.

back extension Superman swimmers core workout

Lunge With A Bicep Curl And Overhead Press

  1. Get in a lunge stance while holding dumbbells or kettlebells in both hands at your sides.
  2. Bend both knees as you bring the back knee toward the floor (into a deep lunge).
  3. As you return to your original stance, curl your arms up until your elbows are bent past 90 degrees (bicep curl).
  4. Once you reach the top of your lunge, do a full overhead press.
  5. Bring the hands back to your side as you move into the next deep lunge.

Make sure you keep your weight evenly distributed through your feet (no leaning forward) and knees in line with (and behind) your toes as you bend.

lunge with overhead press kettlebell outdoor workout

Single-Leg Dead Lift

  1. Holding light weights in both hands, shift your weight onto one leg and find your balance.
  2. Then, hinge forward at the hips as you reach with your opposite hand for the inner ankle (the free leg will extend behind you).
  3. Stay slow and controlled as you return to the starting position.
  4. Switch to the other side when ready.

Try standing on a foam pad for an additional coordination challenge.

single leg deadlift workout exercise

Rotator Cuff Strengthening With Static Sumo Squats

  1. Stand with your feet wider than hip-width and the toes pointing out slightly.
  2. Hold a resistance band in both hands with the palms up and elbows bent and tucked into your sides.
  3. Assume a deep wide squat that you will hold while completing your arm exercise.
  4. While keeping your elbows tucked into your side, pull the hands away from each other as you externally rotate the shoulders and squeeze the shoulder blades together.

Focus on keeping good posture and keeping the neck relaxed. The motion should be slow and controlled.

rotator cuff exercise resistance band

The caveat of specificity training

Specificity training is the theory that in order to make improvements with a specific sport, you must train your body to do those specific movements. Makes sense, right? However, when you are doing three completely different sports that require slightly different muscular coordination, this can be a tough balance to find.

Multi-move exercises are the way to go

Always try to incorporate key body stabilizers into your lifting routine, like the rotator cuff, shoulder blades, glutes, and abdominals. Challenge these muscles in ways that promote dynamic strength that you can easily carry over to your swimming, cycling, and running form. As a triathlete, don’t be afraid to get creative with your lifting routine and find what works for you.

About the author: Kevin Jones is a fitness coach and enthusiast. He writes about all things surrounding health, fitness, wellness, and nutrition. Kevin found his love for running on the trails in the Wasatch Mountain Range and regularly participates in half and full marathons.