• Handstand For A Faster Swim

    handstand swim faster workout fitness

    Want to swim faster, develop a stronger core, and look really cool? You need to be able to rock a handstand! 

    I am not a believer in quick fixes. That goes for getting strong, getting fast, getting flexible, getting ripped. Living my life by the ‘if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is’ motto has helped me avoid many scams and provided me with much needed reality. However, I believe that my challenge of mastering the handstand will help me to develop core strength, develop shoulder strength, and my final goal is to be able to do handstand push-ups. All this, and I have a goal of 2 months. 

    Day 1

    4 sets of 1-minute with the palms of my hands between 90cm and 1m away from the wall. By set 4 my body is shaking, my arms are shaking, and my core is screaming out. I was expecting to feel a lot more light-headed but it felt fine. Getting into position was pretty easy, walking up the wall and I didn’t feel off balance.

    Day 2

    For day two I did the same but with my hands closer to the wall. I felt the same pains but at least I know I'm getting stronger!

    Day 3

    On day four my palms are 70cm away from the wall; 1 foot closer than a few days ago. I'm now up to sets of 5 for 1-minute each and I am resting for 4 minutes between. The last 2 sets were very tough: my shaky arms were just screaming out for the minute to end. Oh, and the dismount (I’m guessing that’s what coming down off the wall is officially called) needs some work. A kind of splat at the base of the wall doesn’t feel very elegant. 

    Week 2

    Feeling fresh after the weekend, I got my palms to 60cm from the wall. Woah, feels a bit steep! But OK. Mixing this up with some press-ups and a few sit-ups, the minute timer on my phone could not come sooner by the third set.

    A couple of days into week two and my palms are now just 50cm away from the wall. It seems a little easier to hold the minute today and my feet feel light against the wall. Feels to me like the beginning of a handstand!

    After about 1 month my palms are more or less 30cm away from the wall. Mind over matter “I won’t fall over. I won’t fall over”. It is certainly a workout on the wrists from the lack of flexibility.

    Now in the second month (end of week 1) I have now dropped my rest intervals down to 3 minutes between each minute of handstand-planking against the wall. Repeating for 5 sets. Not sure when that slipped in but it has! (I am sure I started at 4). I am also only doing this week days. So I am feeling stronger and now I think ready to take the leap of faith into the second stage whatever that may be.
    Posted by Daniel Puddick
  • Swimming Workout For Arm Strength

    swimming workout training arm strength

    As a swimmer, your arm strength is paramount to your performance. Try this arm strength training session by our friends at Swimovate to really see results.

    swimming workout training sessions swimmers

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What Is Cross Training For Runners?

    what is cross training for runners

    If you've followed any type of marathon or half marathon training plan, you will no doubt have seen that you should be doing 'cross training' throughout the week as well as running. But what exactly is it? Which type is best? And how is it beneficial for runners? We answer all these questions and more.

    What is cross training?

    When most people hear the phrase 'cross training', they immediately think of the cross trainer (or elliptical) at the gym, but this isn't quite the case. Cross training for runners is simply any other type of training that can supplement and benefit your running training. A triathlete naturally does cross training by swimming, cycling, and running all together as part of their training, but runners can get stuck in a rut of just running. It's hugely important to do cross-training, read on to find out why.

    Read more: 10 Tips To Survive Your First Marathon

    cycling cross training

    Cross training benefits

    So why should runners be doing cross training? Research has found that runners who do cross training such as strength training at a gym are less likely to get running injuries, are more likely to have a higher VO2 max, and are able to perform better. Of course it's perfectly logical that having stronger muscles would mean you are stronger in your running and will be able to get more power out of your training session.

    Depending on the training plan you are following, you may find that cross training replaces some rest days. An intermediate marathon or half marathon training plan will often have you training 6 days a week, with 5 of those for running, 2 or 3 for cross training, and one for rest.  

    Read more: Cross Training Workout For Runners

    gym weights strength training cross-training running

    Is yoga cross training?

    Yoga is certainly a type of cross training, although it may not hold all of the benefits of other sports such as swimming, cycling, and strength training. Yoga has many benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, increasing flexibility, and improving posture and balance. All of these are things that would be beneficial to runners, and therefore doing yoga once a week as part of your training should help you to improve your running performance.

    Read more: Yoga For Runners

    yoga for runners

    Is cycling good cross training for running?

    Cycling is possibly one of the best types of cross-training for running as it targets the legs and core and therefore will strengthen the key muscle groups used when running. Not only this, as it is an aerobic exercise, you will be improving your fitness but it is a low impact activity so will give your joints a chance to rest. 

    A great way to train for the last part of a half marathon or marathon when you are running on empty and struggling to keep going is to do a brick workout. This is a type of workout employed by triathletes and duathletes whereby you go for a run straight after a bike ride. It gets your legs used to running when tired and is a great way for runners to practice keeping going when fatigued and running low on energy.

    cycling triathlon activewear trisuit Sundried

    What is the best type of cross training?

    Swimming

    Swimming is a great way to cross-train as it is zero impact and so will give your joints a chance to recover from pounding the pavements while working your muscles hard. Not only this, it works your muscles in a completely different way to activities like gym workouts and cycling and so will give you a great full-body workout. On top of this, the breath control needed for swimming could help to put you in good habits with your running.

    Strength Training

    This is usually the most popular choice for runners as it is proven to be hugely beneficial to performance, physiology, and fitness. Lifting weights and working on your main muscle groups like core, back, and legs will have a significant impact on your running and will also help to improve the way you look. 

    Skipping

    Skipping is an activity you may not have thought about for cross-training, but it can be hugely beneficial. Skipping works your calf muscles as well as testing the flexibility in your ankle joint, and this translates well to running as they can be areas that are neglected in other parts of training. 

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • How To Make Your Own Energy Gels & Bars For Endurance Training

    endurance athlete running marathon

    If you're an endurance athlete, you'll know how expensive it can be to buy countless energy gels and bars for long training rides, runs, and races. A great alternative is to make your own, as this is more economically sustainable and also means you know exactly what is going into them.

    Trail Mix

    One of the easiest things to make for an endurance event is trail mix. As is hinted in the name, trail mix was originally developed for long hikes as a source of energy which is easy to make and suitable for carrying long distances. The great thing about trail mix is you can put whatever you like best into it and leave out anything you don't like.

    Trail mix is usually made up on granola, oats, nuts, seeds, and even chocolate. If you want more protein, add more seeds and nuts into your mix. If you feel you need a larger sugar boost, add more chocolate, and if you feel you need lots of carbs to keep you going, bulk out your recipe with more granola and oats.

    There is no right or wrong way to make trail mix, and tasty additions can include dried coconut curls, banana chips and dried fruit.

    trail mix hiking outdoors endurance activity

    Homemade Granola Bar Recipe

    Another easily portable and tasty snack to keep you fuelled on a long endurance trip is a granola bar. Branded bars can set you back quite a lot even though they're easy to make, so why not make you're own? Try our homemade no-bake granola bar recipe for your next run or ride.

    Ingredients

    • 100g oats
    • 30g butter
    • 25g sugar
    • 50g honey or agave nectar
    • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • a pinch of salt
    • 40g flaked almonds
    • 30g raisins
    • 20g chocolate chips

    Method

    • Preheat oven to Gas Mark 4.
    • Line bottom and sides of a 9-inch square pan with baking parchment leaving about an inch sticking over the top.
    • Put the oats and almonds on a small baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes or until lightly toasted, stirring them around occasionally. Put to one side.
    • Combine the butter, honey, sugar, vanilla extract and salt in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Stir occasionally until the butter melts and the sugar completely dissolves.
    • Pour the butter mixture into a bowl and add the toasted oats and almonds. Mix well.
    • Let the mixture cool for about 5 minutes then stir in the raisins and half the chocolate chips.
    • Transfer the mixture to the lined pan and press down so it's even. 
    • Scatter the remaining chocolate chips over over the mixture and gently press them into the top.
    • Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, but overnight is best.
    • Pull the baking parchment up so that the block of granola comes out of the tin in one piece then slice into bars.
    • Store bars in an airtight container for up to one week. If you prefer soft bars, keep them at room temperature or for slightly harder bars, store them in the fridge.

    homemade granola bars trail mix sugar energy

    Energy Gel Recipe

    If you prefer something less bulky and solid for your training, then energy gels are for you. Making your own is easier than you'd think and can save a lot of money!

    Ingredients

    • 130g brown rice syrup (this can be expensive, but there are cheaper versions available in most supermarkets)
    • 70g barley malt syrup (again, opt for the ones you find in the supermarket)
    • 35g coconut oil
    • 35g smooth peanut butter (make sure it's an organic version with no sugar, salt, or palm oil added)
    • a pinch of salt
    • 60 ml hot water

    Method

    1. Place a glass jar in a saucepan then fill the saucepan with water so the jar is a little more than half immersed.
    2. Mix together all the ingredients except for the hot water and put them in the jar.
    3. Warm the mixture over a medium-low heat, stirring frequently until it’s runny and well combined. This should take about 10-15 minutes.
    4. Add the hot water to the jar, stir, and shake vigorously until well combined and no separation occurs. Allow to cool completely
    5. Fill gel containers as needed for workouts.
    6. Store extra gel in the jar with a lid in a cool, dry place.
    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What To Do When You Hit A Training Plateau

    training plateau weight loss

    If you feel like you're working harder than ever but not seeing any changes or improvements, you've hit a plateau. Follow our tips to find out why you might have stopped progressing and how to break through it. 

    What is the meaning of hit a plateau?

    When you 'hit a plateau' it means you have stopped progressing. In weight loss terms, this means you have stopped losing weight and are sitting at a constant. In training terms, this means you have stopped improving on your times or weights.

    There are lots of reasons why you might hit a plateau, but the worst thing you can do is let it affect you negatively. If you have been trying to lose weight for some time and you stop seeing results, this can be a trigger to ruin your progress by giving up. However, it's important to remember how far you've come and stay strong.

    If you've hit a plateau in your training, this means it's time to mix things up and take your training up a gear. Again, there may be several reasons why you have hit a plateau, so just take some time to re-evaluate and always remember your goals. 

    plateau training weight loss progress

    How do you break a weight loss plateau?

    If you've ever tried to lose weight, you'll know that the first few pounds will come off relatively easy, but then weight loss gets harder. Famously, it's the last few pounds that just won't budge and you might find your weight stagnant for quite some time. One of the main reasons we find ourselves at a weight loss plateau is because we don't adapt and change our diet and lifestyle as we lose the weight. 

    If your starting weight was quite high, all you would need to do is eat a little less and exercise a little more each day and you would lose weight. People with a higher body fat percentage will burn more calories than a slimmer person because their body has to work harder. As you lose the weight and get fitter, the same diet and exercise routine that you were doing before will not be as effective.

    The best way to break through a weight loss plateau, therefore, is to adapt and change your diet and workout routine. You will need to increase your calorie expenditure and mix up your training to shock the system. Your body is very good and adapting to stress and so if you continually do the same workout and eat the same food, soon your body will become used to that and stop changing.

    Try doing a high intensity workout like this 5 minute punch bag workout which will shock your body into burning more calories. It's also important to workout your full body, so try this full body circuit workout for fat loss. It's also important not to neglect your core, so have a go at this flat stomach abs workout for real results.

    weight loss plateau

    What do you do when you hit a fitness plateau?

    If you have stopped seeing results at the gym, it is time to mix up your workout routine. If you have a specifical goal, like running a marathon or completing an Ironman, it's best to follow a set training plan. If you have just been winging it until now, find a training plan that works best for you and your goals.

    Beginner Triathlon Training Plan

    10k Training Plan

    Half Marathon Training Plan

    If you are trying to get stronger, there are lots of ways you can break through a plateau and increase the amount you can lift.

    Firstly, make sure you are doing accessory lifts. If your goal is to get a PB on the squat, deadlift, or bench press, you won't get there just by doing that lift. Accessory exercises are lifts that complement one of the big lifts by working the supporting and stabilising muscles which will improve your form and help you increase the amount of weight you can lift. For bench press, make sure you're doing dumbbell flyes and press ups. For deadlifts, do plenty of bent over row and lat pull down. For squats, do lunges and single legged leg press.

    If you are trying to get faster at running, there are lots of things you can do to improve. For more in depth information, read our article on how to get faster at running.

    The bottom line is that you need to make sure you are not stuck in a rut. If you have hit a plateau, it's probably because you have become too comfortable in your routine and need to mix it up. Make sure that you do not give up when you stop seeing results, as it will be the best results that come after you break through the plateau. 

    Posted by Alexandra Parren