• The Benefits of Joining A Running Club

    Flyers Southend Running Club

    It can be hard to stay motivated when running solo. Cold winters, shin splints, boring playlists... sometimes getting up and out can be the hardest part. So what about joining a running club? Have you ever thought about it? What are the benefits, and are there any drawbacks?

    Companionship

    Running alone can be dreadfully lonely, especially on the long winter nights when you find yourself plodding along for 10 miserable miles. But who said running has to be boring? If you join a running club, you'll be among like-minded people who may be training for a specific event or just out for a fun jog with their friends. You'll meet people from your town who you may never have met otherwise, so it's a great opportunity to make friends. 

    Motivation

    There's been countless times that I've set out for a run but ended up turning back after only a mile or two because it's too cold or I'm too tired or my legs hurt too much. But if you're running with a club, there is much more motivation to keep going. You can chat to your running buddies to keep your mind occupied and you can explore new routes, which will be covered in the next point.

    New Routes

    When I run, I'm very guilty of always going the same way, which can get very boring after a while. I'm not very adventurous with my runs because I'm never too sure of where will be safe to run, or if the route will even have pavement the whole way along. I certainly never bother to drive out to a run location; I always start and finish at home. But by joining a running club you will be encouraged to try new routes that you would never have even dreamt of before. The best part is that the distance will already be tried and tested so all you will have to do is turn up and run! You may experience runs through woodlands or off-road for the first time which is a great added bonus.

    Safety In Numbers

    Running alone, especially in the evening, can feel a little unsafe. Running with a club means you will be a lot safer in all aspects as there will be so many people running alongside you. Traffic is also more likely to stop to let you cross the road if there is a large number of you, so your run will be less interrupted if you are running on busy streets or in a city.

    Doors to other events

    Before I joined a running club, I never even thought about running a race or joining the local Parkrun. By being a member of a club, you will end up being motivated to train for events such as 10ks and half marathons, which are always more enjoyable when you have comrades to cheer you on. Feeling part of a team is a fantastic feeling. 

    Choosing the right club

    There may well be more than one running club in your town or city, so choosing the right one is fairly important as they are not all the same. In my town for example, we have one club which is free of charge to be a member of and it is very much a relaxed group of people who love to run for fun and eat cake afterwards! There is another club which is on the other end of the spectrum, who take running very seriously, so they motivate each other in a very different way. This club has an annual fee, however being an affiliated club means you get cheaper entry to races so after a while your fee should pay for itself. Run Together has a list of nationwide running clubs, or doing a simple Google search will provide you with local clubs around you.

    Parkrun Running Club Get Fit Outdoors

    Parkrun

    If you don't feel ready to join a run club just yet, why not try Parkrun? This weekly event is a 5k run held in your local park (you can find your closest Parkrun here) It is a growing community, with hundreds of participants showing up each week at each location! It is completely free of charge and you can be of any ability, many people just walk the course. It's great for those trying to improve their running as it is chip timed so you get an official finish time every time you turn up and run. The atmosphere is incredibly supportive and it will allow you to meet like-minded people from your local area who are all there for the same reason - to get fit and enjoy the process!

    So what are you waiting for! Let's get running!

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • Guest Post: Chris Hatton Wins The Rayleigh 10k!

    Chris Hatton Sundried Rayleigh 10k Race Running Having booked the Southend Triathlon in for 2017 I was keen to get a couple of events in beforehand. For me, it's important to have these smaller races in the diary before a big event to give myself a good assessment on where my fitness levels are. It’s equally important to be race prepared; racing is very different to training and psychologically it’s important I get in ‘race mode’ as often as possible! I have also set myself personal goals this year focused on improving my running times one of which is to get a sub 35 minute 10k.

    The first event that I took part in was the Rayleigh 10k. This was a new event for 2017 and attracted me as it was entirely off road on bridleways, through woods, and around fields. The route itself was very technical with lots of tree roots, corners, gates, and uneven ground to manoeuvre around - not to mention the horses! The organisers did a good job spraying arrows on the floor to avoid confusion but navigation was still tricky in places. There were a number of hills but none that were too steep, and what goes up must come down meaning faster running on the downhill parts! I seem to thrive in these conditions and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    My training has been going pretty well with some very tough structured sessions focused on helping me reach my running goals, but as we lined up at the start I spotted that there were at least three other runners that I knew could beat me (and had done so a few times!) The training plans paid off and after being part of a two-man lead for the first 6k, I noticed myself edging ahead. I wasn’t sure if this was due to me speeding up or the other runner slowing down, but I fought hard not to look behind me to check the gap.

    I was running in a Sundried Ortler T-shirt. These do great on race day as they are light-weight and super comfortable, as well as having sweat-wicking technology which kept me dry under the pressure of racing! 

    I finished the race in first place with a time of 36:06. I had set a 35-minute target but given the tricky terrain, I was happy with the time. I was 20 seconds ahead of second place who I hung onto for the first 6k.

    Chris Hatton Rayleigh 10k Running Race Winner Medal

    The race was organised very well for a first event and it was a great course making the most of the surrounding woods around Hockley and Cherry Orchard Way. There were 300 runners and a good number of local running clubs represented.

    Now on to the Rochford 10k on the 14 May and most importantly the Southend Triathlon on the 28 May!

    About the author: Chris has been running seriously since 2009 and has completed many 5ks, 10ks and half marathons since then. He has also competed in a number of Triathlons from sprint distance to half iron distance. He has a busy 2017 planned and has already won both the Hadleigh 10k with a five-year course record and the Rayleigh 10k.
    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • Sundried Ambassador Laura Sheriff Completes Total Warrior

    Laura Sherriff Total Warrior Sundried Ambassador

    Last weekend, personal trainer and presenter Laura Sheriff took part in one of the toughest 10ks out there, the Total Warrior 10k. We found out how she got on.

    How are you feeling after completing the race?

    Like a warrior! Ready for the next challenge!

    What type of training did you do to prepare for this event?

    I actually did very little training because I’m still recovering from shoulder surgery. It was all a little last minute involving HIIT workouts, a few runs, and circuits at the gym.

    What was the atmosphere like on race day?

    Brilliant! Everyone was game for a great time and there was a real sense of community. Most people who do these races get hooked and do them time and time again.

    What was the hardest obstacle you faced?

    The ice bucket. You have to drop into a tank filled with ice and put your head under to come out of the other side. It literally takes your breath away!

    Laura Sheriff Total Warrior Team

    Laura posing with her other half Craig Phillips, right, who is a well-loved TV personality.

    Who was better, you or Craig?

    I’d love to say me, but I’d actually say that Craig needed a medal. He had to hoist me over some of the larger obstacles to make sure I didn’t overuse my shoulder. Having said that I would agree that I won hands down in the style stakes.

    How did you find racing in the Sundried tights? 

    At first, I was a little worried how they would fair in the muddy, soaking wet environment. Were they going to stretch and go baggy? But actually, they pretty much kept as perfect a fit as they did when I first put them on! Fashion and performance, what more could a girl want?

    Anything you would change if you were to do it all over again?

    I’d obviously like my shoulder to be stronger but I’d also like to go for a time.

    Laura Sheriff Total Warrior finishline

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • 10k Training Plan

    10k-training-plan-half-marathon

    Running a 10k is a great challenge. At 6.2 miles it’s tougher than a 5k but doesn't require as much effort and stamina as a half marathon or marathon. With the right attitude, training routine, and effort, anyone can run a 10k.

    10k Run Training Plan

    We recommend you do around 3 runs per week incorporating intervals, tempo, and distance runs. We suggest you save your long run for the weekend when you have more time and energy. Mix and match the following intervals, tempo, and distance training systems over 6-12 weeks and you'll be well on your way to running a great 10k.

    Intervals

    For your first run, your intervals are most likely to be between walking and running, however as you get fitter, these will be sprints and jogs. Interval training increases your V02 max, which is your lungs' ability to uptake oxygen and transport it around your body. Increasing this will improve your stamina and help you last the distance.

    Warm up: Spend 3-5 minutes warming up. This can be anything from a walk to a light jog. Circle the arms to warm up the shoulders and allow your heart rate to get going.

    Intervals: Jog or walk for 2 minutes, run or sprint for 30 seconds. Repeat 10 times, lasting a total of 25 minutes. As this is your first run, the intervals are followed by plenty of recovery to allow your heart rate to come back down in between sets.

    Cool Down: Walk for 2-3 minutes before completing a minimum of 5 minutes of cool down stretches, you may want to incorporate a foam roller if you suffer from tight calves.

    Tempo

    Tempo runs should be comfortably hard. You should be aiming to maintain a tough pace, for 20 minutes. Tempo runs are important as they are a median between intervals and distance training runs. You are pushing your body in the same way as you do for intervals, but not quite as intensely and for a longer duration. By doing this, you are pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and your body will adapt and change to become fitter and stronger.

    Warm up the same as before, then run for 20 minutes at a pace that you can maintain but in which you couldn't hold a conversation and you feel like you want to stop and have to really push to keep going.

    Distance

    Doing one distance run per week will get you used to spending more time on your feet, which is important for training your muscles and joints. For a 10k, your distance run should be anywhere up to about 5 miles. Take your time and run at a comfortable pace, one where you could hold a conversation while running. Try to enjoy this run and keep reminding yourself why you are doing this to stay motivated.

    Top Tips For Running

    1. It’s all about mindset. Break you run down into smaller chunks so that it doesn't feel like a long slog.
    2. Find a running buddy. If you’ve got someone to try to keep up with, you’ll run that little bit harder. You’re also less likely to cancel if there’s someone to let down.
    3. Don’t try and run too far on your first go. Ease yourself into the training routine and listen to your body. You'll be amazed at how quickly it becomes easier.
    Posted by Alexandra Parren