10k-training-plan-half-marathon

Running a 10k is a great challenge. At 6.2 miles it’s tougher than a 5k but doesn't require as much effort and stamina as a half marathon or marathon. With the right attitude, training routine, and effort, anyone can run a 10k.

10k Run Training Plan

We recommend you do around 3 runs per week incorporating intervals, tempo, and distance runs. We suggest you save your long run for the weekend when you have more time and energy. Mix and match the following intervals, tempo, and distance training systems over 6-12 weeks and you'll be well on your way to running a great 10k.

Intervals

For your first run, your intervals are most likely to be between walking and running, however as you get fitter, these will be sprints and jogs. Interval training increases your V02 max, which is your lungs' ability to uptake oxygen and transport it around your body. Increasing this will improve your stamina and help you last the distance.

Warm up: Spend 3-5 minutes warming up. This can be anything from a walk to a light jog. Circle the arms to warm up the shoulders and allow your heart rate to get going.

Intervals: Jog or walk for 2 minutes, run or sprint for 30 seconds. Repeat 10 times, lasting a total of 25 minutes. As this is your first run, the intervals are followed by plenty of recovery to allow your heart rate to come back down in between sets.

Cool Down: Walk for 2-3 minutes before completing a minimum of 5 minutes of cool down stretches, you may want to incorporate a foam roller if you suffer from tight calves.

Tempo

Tempo runs should be comfortably hard. You should be aiming to maintain a tough pace, for 20 minutes. Tempo runs are important as they are a median between intervals and distance training runs. You are pushing your body in the same way as you do for intervals, but not quite as intensely and for a longer duration. By doing this, you are pushing yourself out of your comfort zone and your body will adapt and change to become fitter and stronger.

Warm up the same as before, then run for 20 minutes at a pace that you can maintain but in which you couldn't hold a conversation and you feel like you want to stop and have to really push to keep going.

Distance

Doing one distance run per week will get you used to spending more time on your feet, which is important for training your muscles and joints. For a 10k, your distance run should be anywhere up to about 5 miles. Take your time and run at a comfortable pace, one where you could hold a conversation while running. Try to enjoy this run and keep reminding yourself why you are doing this to stay motivated.

Top Tips For Running

  1. It’s all about mindset. Break you run down into smaller chunks so that it doesn't feel like a long slog.
  2. Find a running buddy. If you’ve got someone to try to keep up with, you’ll run that little bit harder. You’re also less likely to cancel if there’s someone to let down.
  3. Don’t try and run too far on your first go. Ease yourself into the training routine and listen to your body. You'll be amazed at how quickly it becomes easier.

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