• Peanut Butter Chocolate Chia Protein Mousse Recipe

    Chocolate chia protein mousse healthy dessert recipe

    This healthy dessert recipe by Peachy Palate for our friends at Pulsin is sure to make your mouth water and satisfy those sweet cravings!

    Ingredients

    • 80g whole chia seeds
    • 20g cocoa powder
    • 125ml oat milk
    • 20ml maple syrup
    • 30g Pulsin Cacao Maca Supershake Energy Blend
    • 30g Peanut Butter of choice
    • 375ml water
    • To serve...peanut butter, dark chocolate shavings, yogurt or non dairy alternative of choice!

    Method

    1. Place all ingredients into a large jug. Give everything a good stir, place into the fridge and leave to sit for one hour. Stir up to ensure the chia seeds aren’t clumping up and then return to the fridge for 3 hours or overnight.
    2. Place the mixture into a high speed blender; you will not be able to create a smooth pudding in a food processor.
    3. Blend for 5 minutes until the pudding is thick and smooth.
    4. Divide between serving glasses or bowls and top with desired toppings. Can be kept in the fridge for up to three days.

    chocolate PB protein mousse Peachy Palate healthy dessert recipe Pulsin

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • Chocolate Orange Protein Pancake Recipe

    protein pancakes

    Do you struggle to get enough protein into your diet? Did you buy an expensive protein powder and have no idea how to introduce it into your diet? Or just looking for a new and healthy breakfast to replace that boring cereal? Protein pancakes are a quick and easy way to have a highly nutritious and tasty breakfast! Here is one of our favourite recipes!

    Ingredients:

    • 1 sachet of Wheybox chocolate orange whey protein
    • 50g egg whites
    • 1 medium-sized overripe banana
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder

    Method:

    1. Use a hand mixer to blend up all the ingredients until well mixed.
    2. Heat some coconut oil in a pan and tip in your pancake mix, 1 heaped tbsp at a time.
    3. Leave to cook for a couple of minutes. These pancakes don't use flour so they are slightly more fragile than usual, therefore you should cook the other side by folding them in half into a half moon shape!
    4. Leave for another couple of minutes then pile on your plate and top with yogurt, nut butter and popcorn!

    Thanks to the banana, these pancakes have a soft texture and are naturally quite sweet.

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What I Eat In A Day – Claire Steels Duathlete

    What I Eat In A Day Claire Steels Duathlete

    Claire Steels is a world champion duathlete and works hard for her fantastic racing results. We take a look at what this elite athlete eats in a day to fuel her for her big events.

    Breakfast

    Banacakes (pancakes with banana)

    Banana Pancakes Nutrition Healthy

    I have been playing around with how to make this breakfast for a while and I think I have cracked it! The mix is made up of 1 banana mashed up with 2 eggs. Beat it all together and cook in a small frying pan. You can split the mixture to have lots of smaller pancakes and it is a little easier to cook too! I top with peanut butter as I'm a bit of an addict!

    Lunch

    Pesto chicken wraps

    Pesto Chicken Wraps Protein Clean Eating

    I make these filling wraps with spinach, rocket, avocado and a bit mayonnaise. Lots of protein to keep me fuelled and vegetables for their health benefits.

    Snacks

    Banana topped with sunflower seeds and honey

    Banana Yogurt Healthy Snack

    I have this almost daily! Sometimes as part of breakfast, sometimes as pudding, or sometimes just as a snack! 

    Dinner

    Pizza!

    Healthy Homemade Pizza

    Racing in the morning! Pizza is my favourite pre-race meal! I love all of the training and racing that comes with being an elite athlete and a big part of that is because of all of the food I get to eat, and I have always been a huge pizza fan! For this meal, I opted for a pre-made pizza base and then added my own topping because I was feeling creative! I went for my own version of a Quattro: tomato puree base, pesto chicken (leftover from lunch), caramelised red onion, mushrooms, spinach, rocket, and parmesan cheese. It was amazing and the race went pretty well too!

    Read more from our What I Eat In A Day Series

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

    what is the ketogenic diet?

    Chances are you have a rough idea what the Atkins diet is, and now you're hearing people talk about being on a 'keto' diet. But what does it mean? Is it an effective way of losing weight or just another fad diet?

    What can you eat on a ketogenic diet?

    The ketogenic diet is an extreme low carb diet plan which aims to aid weight loss through achieving a state called 'ketosis'. When your body is in a state of ketosis, it burns fat as fuel instead of carbohydrate and the theory is that this is a good way to drop body fat. However, it is an extremely complicated and scientific process and must be followed very strictly for it to work. 

    With regards to what you can eat, the keto diet is strictly high fat, low carb. To be more specific, nearly no carbs at all. As soon as you slip and eat a small amount of carbohydrates, your body will snap out of ketosis and you will pile on weight due to your body storing the carbs. Ketosis is a state our body adapts to naturally when food supplies are low; it is a form of starvation mode. Whenever the body is in starvation mode, it naturally wants to hold on to as much energy as possible because it thinks there's a low food supply. So if you slip up or eat a snack, you'll hold on to it more so than if you were not following a keto diet.

    A typical keto meal plan will consist of eggs, bacon and other fatty meats, double cream and other high fat dairy, and vegetables. You strictly cannot eat any sugar so that means no fruit or junk food, no starch so no potatoes, beans, or legumes, and no grains so no bread or cereals. It is a ridiculously tough 'diet' to stick to and it is advised that you should employ the help of a trained physician or medical professional as it is so complicated. This is not a diet to be taken lightly and it is strongly recommended not to follow it if you have not done proper research first.

    weight loss low carb diet

    Is the ketogenic diet safe?

    The ketogenic diet was actually originally created as a way of controlling and treating epilepsy, and diet regimens like this have been used for hundreds of years. When modern treatments and anti-epileptic drugs became more widely available in the early 20th century, the use of extreme fasting diets declined. However, people began adopting this regimen for weight loss and interest has spiked in recent years, especially following the fame of the notorious Atkins diet. 

    There are a lot of negative side effects to being in a state of ketosis. Most infamously is the bad breath you will suffer. You will also suffer from increased urination as ketosis is a natural diuretic and this will also lead to suffering from an extremely dry mouth. It is also highly likely that you'll suffer from the 'keto flu' which has symptoms including headaches, nausea, fatigue, and cramping. As the ketogenic diet employs a lot of fasting, be prepared to be very hungry a lot of the time too!

    In answer to the question, "is it safe?" the answer is only if it is followed properly. Any type of fasting or extreme change in diet should be monitored by a healthcare professional otherwise it could be potentially dangerous. If you still want to try this diet after reading the above, make sure you do your research first and are fully prepared. 

    black and white image of measuring tape belly

    How many carbs can you eat and still be in ketosis?

    If you limit your carbohydrate intake severely by eating less than 15g per day, you will enter ketosis more quickly. You can eat up to 25g of carbs per day and still be in ketosis. Any more than this and you risk snapping back and storing fat. Your total carbohydrate intake should be no more than 5% of your total daily calories. You should have 75% fat and 25% protein. This is really not a recommendable ratio of macros and you should proceed with extreme caution. 

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What Is Gluten And Why Are Foods Gluten-Free?

    What Is Gluten

    What is gluten? What is a gluten-free diet? Why is it bad for some people?

    New research by YouGov has found that as many as 60% of adults in the UK have bought a gluten-free product, whilst 10% of households contain someone who believes gluten is bad for them. But what actually is gluten? And how can it affect our health?

    What is gluten?

    Gluten is actually a protein component and is commonly found in wheat, barley, and rye. It is made up of two forms of proteins: gliadin and glutenin. When these cereal grains are mixed with water, the proteins in gluten form a sticky texture with a glue-like consistency and this is how soft, doughy foods are made. The glue-like property of this mixture is what makes the dough elastic and gives the chewy, stodgy texture. The name gluten is derived from the fact it is glue-like in texture.

    Why is gluten bad for some people?

    Most people will not suffer any negative side effects from eating gluten. However, some people suffer from gluten-intolerant diseases, the most notable being coeliac disease, and this can cause them some distress if they ingest the protein. Coeliac is a fairly common digestive problem whereby the small intestine becomes inflamed and unable to digest any nutrients. Those who truly suffer from a gluten intolerance may become seriously ill after consuming it. Most people who think they have a gluten intolerance just become bloated from eating too much and stretching the stomach, and confuse this for a real illness.

    Will gluten-free make you lose weight?

    No, it won't. Removing gluten from your diet and eating special gluten-free products will not help you to lose weight as it does not affect the calorie balance of your food intake. In fact, many gluten-free foods still contain a high number of calories, sugar, and fat, and so by thinking it's healthy and eating more, you're actually likely to gain weight. If you don't have a diagnosed condition, you don't need to eat gluten-free foods.

    Who should go gluten-free?

    If a person suffers from coeliac disease, eating a product containing gluten means their body physically cannot digest it and it triggers their immune system to start damaging their small intestine. Gluten does this to a coeliac by destroying their villi. Villi are tiny protrusions which line the intestine and transfer essential nutrients into the bloodstream. Once the villi are damaged, a person will become malnourished, regardless of their food consumption, as their body simply cannot absorb the right nutrients from what’s being ingested. Coeliac is a serious disease and so you would know if you have it. If you're not sure, it can be diagnosed with a blood test. Those with coeliac disease must avoid gluten in order to stay nourished and healthy. Those without this disease have absolutely no reason no to eat gluten, and if they are becoming bloated often, this is probably due to something else.

    Important facts about coeliac disease

    • Coeliac UK found that the disease affects only 1 in 100 adults in the UK.
    • Coeliac disease is not an allergy or an intolerance, it is an autoimmune disease.
    • You cannot ‘grow out’ of Coeliac disease, it is a lifelong disease.
    • As little as a breadcrumb of gluten can harm someone with Coeliac disease.

     

    Posted by Alexandra Parren