• Healthy Sugar Free Banana Bread Recipe

    Healthy Sugar Free Banana Loaf Recipe

    Sundried ambassador Anne Iarchy is a personal trainer and nutritionist. She shares with us her deliciously healthy sugar-free banana loaf recipe.

    Truly sugar-free banana cake

    A few weeks ago, I was working at the Woburn Tri for Life, and at the end of a very successful day, we had masses of bananas left. After eating a banana a day for a few days, the rest of the bananas I took home were a little too ripe to my taste (I do like them just yellow from green), so I decided to bake a banana loaf.

    I have two recipes, one with sugar and butter, one with coconut oil and dates, but I really wanted one with no sugar at all. After all, ripe bananas are very sweet. I did some research on the internet, and I was really surprised to see how many recipes came up “pretending” they were sugar-free, but just swapping the sugar to honey, maple syrup, or agave syrup and other sweeteners.

    Although honey is healthier than sugar (and that depends on the amount of processing of the honey), it has the same effect on blood sugar levels and insulin release than sugar.

    Here is my truly sugar-free banana loaf recipe which still tastes amazing and is much healthier than any other you will find.

    Raw ingredients healthy snack

    Ingredients:

    • 6-7 overripe bananas, previously frozen and defrosted
    • 1/4 cup melted coconut oil
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
    • 2 cups of gluten-free self raising flour (this is what I used but regular self-raising flour will work fine too)
    • 2/3 cup of walnut pieces

    Method:

    1. Preheat oven to 190C (Gas Mark 5)
    2. Lightly grease an 8x4" cake tin
    3. In a bowl, mash the bananas, then whisk in the eggs, vanilla and coconut oil, until properly mixed.
    4. Slowly add the flour bit by bit and stir well with a spoon.
    5. Stir in the walnuts.
    6. Pour your mixture into the tin, then decorate with some walnuts if you want to.
    7. Put in the oven to bake for approx 1 hour, until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

    • Cool before slicing.
    • The cake came out moist and it was definitely sweet enough.
    • A slice of the cake makes a lovely healthy snack.
    • It keeps well for 4-5 days covered in foil.
    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • How To Reduce Your Food Waste

    food waste reduce sustainable living

    We live in an age where food wastage is unprecedented and the modern conveniences of pre-packaged foods combined with ever shortening expiry dates means we throw away and waste a third of all food produced worldwide. Take a look at how you can eat healthily and cut back on waste, two things very close to our hearts here at Sundried.

    Be savvy with expiry dates

    Unfortunately, for those trying to stick to healthy eating it's the fresh fruits and vegetables which expire the quickest while the artificial junk food lasts for months or even years thanks to its many additives. However, it's important to be savvy when it comes to expiration dates so that you don't waste food for no reason.

    Many foods have 'sell by' dates as well as 'use by' dates. The sell by date is simply a marker for the supermarket or store and you don't need to throw away the food by this date. Even some expiration dates can be taken with a pinch of salt as the food will last a lot longer, especially if refrigerated in some cases. You can also freeze foods which are close to their expiration dates to help them last longer. 

    Of course, with foods like meat and fish you should exercise caution as rotten meat can make you very ill. However, fresh fruit and vegetables will often last a lot longer than their expiration dates indicate and you can use common sense to decide if the food is still edible, for example by looking out for mould. Some UK supermarkets like Lidl don't even include use by dates on their fruit and it's down to you to decide if it's still okay to eat.

    More processed products like bread, bagels, and wraps often last a lot longer than their expiration dates may say as they often have additives to lengthen their shelf life. Unless there is mould growing on your bread, you should be okay to eat it even if it's past the use by date. 

    Tip to reduce food waste: Don't throw away food simply because it's close to, on, or past its expiration date.

     fresh produce expiry dates food waste

    Use your common sense to decide when a food is past its best rather than sticking rigidly to expiry dates

    Avoid pre-packaged foods

    Enter any supermarket and the closest aisles to the door are always stocked with pre-packaged food. Shops are now selling more convenience foods than ever, with inventions like packaged smashed avocado and stir fry kits with ready-chopped vegetables.

    Many of these packaged foods are more expensive than their wholefood counterparts because you are paying for convenience. But do you really need to buy smashed avocado in a plastic packet? Can't you just buy a whole, fresh avocado with no packaging whatsoever and smash it yourself?

    These pre-packaged foods are adding single-use plastic unnecessarily and causing a lot of damage to the planet as well as being more costly to you as the consumer. Avoid them at all costs and stick to the real thing.

    Tip to reduce waste: Always choose fresh, whole foods and don't put them into single-use plastic bags – they have their own natural packaging in the form of skin!

    smashed avocado pre-packed food waste

    Why buy avocado in a wasteful plastic packet when an avocado comes in its own natural, biodegradable skin?

    Make use of leftovers

    A lot of food waste is created when we buy or cook too much and then throw away what we can't eat. Instead of making huge portions according to a recipe and then throwing away what you can't eat, you can save the leftovers to have for lunch or dinner the next day or even for the rest of the week, especially if you freeze them. 

    Planning your meals for the week ahead is a great way not only to reduce food waste but also to improve your health. By having a meal plan in place, you are less likely to just grab a ready meal or order a takeaway and you can make sure you have the right ingredients in the right quantities from your weekly shop for your meals. 

    Tip to reduce waste: Plan your meals at the beginning of the week and use leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day.

    reduce food waste meal prep

    Knowing what meals you're going to have throughout the week means you can buy only what you need without wasting any, saving money as well as food waste.

    Make use of store cupboard staples and canned food

    It's something many of us are guilty of doing at one time or another: you grab a plastic bag of pre-packaged lettuce from the supermarket with the intention of eating healthier and making salads for lunch, you never eat it and instead it's left to wilt in the fridge, then you eventually throw away the slimy remains at the end of the week. Is this something you can relate to?

    You need to be realistic with your meal plans and make use of food that can sit in your cupboard until you need it. Many of the most healthy foods available will last a long time; foods like rice, pasta, quinoa, lentils, nuts, seeds, oats... the list goes on. Other healthy foods such as beans, peas, and chickpeas can be bought in cans and will also last months if not years in your cupboard. Try finding recipes that use the ingredients you have in the cupboard instead of buying things you don't need and then wasting them.

    Tip to reduce waste: Stock your cupboards with healthy dry and canned goods instead of constantly buying fresh food which goes off before you get a chance to use it.

    pantry store cupabord

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • Is Stress Making You Fat? | How To Stop Stress Eating

    stress eating nutrition

    We look at how stress and nutrition are related, how stress can lead to over (or under) eating, the serious health issues you could develop due to prolonged stress, and how in turn your diet can potentially reduce your stress levels. Which foods help stress? How does stress affect our eating behaviour? These questions and more will be answered in this informative article on stress and nutrition.

    How can stress affect eating behaviour?

    Stress is widely thought to lead to overeating. While in the short term you may experience a reduction in appetite, over the long term many people are led to overeat as a direct result of stress. One of the reasons for this is that the stress hormone cortisol can lead you to crave sugar, fat, and salt. These foods trigger certain hormones which lift your mood and make you feel better, but only temporarily. This behaviour is then learned, and your body realises that by eating foods high in sugar, fat, and salt, you will start to feel better so you crave them more. However, this is clearly a vicious cycle and one that is best avoided as early as possible.

    According to research, women are more likely than men to reach for food during times of stress. In fact, men are found to crave alcohol and cigarettes during times of stress more than food. However, this means that as a woman, you may end up binge eating to deal with stressful times and situations.

    What does stress do to your digestive system?

    When we are stressed, blood is directed away from the centre of the body and redirected to the brain and limbs to support the natural ‘fight or flight’ response. What this means is that you will have less blood in your gut to help with food absorption and you may be left with indigestion and heart burn. This decreased blood flow to the gut also decreases the metabolism as the body essentially ‘shuts down’ to preserve itself.

    Prolonged stress can lead to several serious health risks such as peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and acid reflux. If you are suffering from any of these issues, it is possible that stress is a leading cause.

    stress eating prevention how to stop binge eating

    Which foods help stress?

    Thankfully, there are some foods which can help to reduce your stress levels and improve your wellbeing. Vitamin B-rich foods like salmon and broccoli are proven to reduce stress while dark chocolate is proven to lower levels of stress hormones in the body meaning you will be not only less stressed but overall more healthy too.

    There are also lots of ways you can manage stress with exercise, as working out releases feel-good hormones called endorphins which are proven to reduce stress, not to mention the fact that a tough gym workout can be a great way to relieve stress physically by doing boxing or something similar.

    stress and nutrition

    How to stop stress-eating

    Follow these tips in order to stop stress-eating and get your diet back on track.

    Avoid caffeine

    Coffee raises your heart rate and can lead to anxiety and insomnia. You may think that drinking a cup of coffee at a stressful time is helping you to be more alert and focused, but it is actually doing the opposite. Cut back on the caffeine as much as possible, and don’t drink coffee after lunch to prevent your sleep being affected.

    Get a stress ball

    Instead of reaching for the sugary snacks to get you through a stressful situation, redirect your energy elsewhere, such as a stress ball. By squeezing a soft ball or clicking a fidget gadget, you can release your nervous energy without damaging your waistline.

    Get to the root of the stress

    This is probably the best way to combat stress-eating: get rid of the source of the stress. If it is your work that is stressing you out, try compartmentalising your workload by writing lists and prioritising important tasks that need attention right away. If it is a certain person who is stressing you out, try talking to them or discussing the issue to get to the root of the problem. If it is someone you don’t know very well, it may be worth cutting ties if their impact on your life is damaging your health.

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • What's The Difference Between Vegan And Plant Based?

    what's the difference between vegan and plant based? Sundried nutrition diet

    Especially after the popularity of Veganuary, veganism is hugely on the rise. Another term that is now floating around is 'plant based' which is used heavily in the groundbreaking new Netflix documentary The Game Changers. We take a look at the important distinctions between 'vegan' and 'plant based'.

    Is Vegan the same as plant based?

    The simplest answer to this is that no, vegan and plant based are not the same thing. All people who are plant based are vegan, but not all vegans are plant based. By extension, being plant-based is a sub-division of veganism

    It's important to remember that eating a vegan diet is not always intrinsically healthy, and that is where veganism and plant based differ the most. As a vegan, you are not eating any animal products or foods made with animal derivatives. This means no red meat, poultry, dairy, or eggs and is often done for ethical and environmental reasons rather than health reasons.

    However, this means that a vegan could still eat unhealthy foods like potato chips, fries, and white bread. In fact, it would be easy for a vegan to be deficient in important vitamins and nutrients and to be more unhealthy than a meat-eater. As a vegan, you might try very hard to replicate all of your old favourites like cheese and meat but in doing so you could harm your health.

    A lot of processed vegan alternatives like 'vegan cheese' and 'vegan burgers' contain a lot of chemicals and although they're better for animal welfare and the environment than eating meat, that's not beneficial to you. Always, the more natural the better. If you're a vegan, it's important to try and maintain a healthy diet and not just focus on eliminating entire food groups and replacing them with chemically-enhanced franken-burgers and sugary carbs. 

    On the contrary, those who are plant-based only eat foods that are, you guessed it, plant based. This means foods like beans, legumes, pulses, fruits, and vegetables. All of these foods are inherently healthy and therefore a plant-based vegan would expect to be more healthy than a non plant based vegan. Some plant-based eaters go one step further and follow a completely raw food diet, which means eating solely uncooked foods. 

    vegetables vegan plant based diet nutrition health

    What do you eat on a plant based diet?

    A plant-based diet is sometimes thought of as being restrictive, but it's absolutely not and if you try transitioning from being an omnivore to being plant-based, you may well discover a lot of new foods you've never tried before. On a plant-based diet, you only eat foods that are whole and natural such as fruits, vegetables, pulses, nuts and seeds, beans, whole grains, and legumes. Of course, any plant based diet is open to interpretation and what works best for you.

    It's important for vegans and those on a plant-based diet to get enough protein and vitamin B3, as these are the macro- and micro-nutrients that can be difficult to get enough of on a meat-free diet. There are plenty of plant-based protein sources that those on a vegan diet can enjoy, mostly from beans, whole grains, pulses, seeds, nuts, and legumes. 

    Read more: Healthy Vegan Brownie Recipe

    what to eat on a plant based diet vegetables legumes

    What to eat on a plant based diet

    Vegan grocery shopping list

    This is what a typical vegan grocery shopping list might look like in order to enjoy a varied and balanced diet that is healthy and provides enough of the right nutrients.

    • Chickpeas
    • Black beans
    • Corn
    • Peas
    • Mushrooms
    • Oats
    • Lentils
    • Wholewheat pasta
    • Brown rice
    • Almond/soy milk
    • Coconut milk/coconut cream
    • Green beans
    • Spinach
    • Kidney beans
    • Quinoa
    • Tomatoes
    • Bananas
    • Strawberries
    • Avocado
    • Vegan protein powder

    From these ingredients there are lots of delicious and healthy recipes you can create, from homemade vegan beanie burgers to vegan protein mousse and tasty salads. 

    Thinking about going vegan? Check out our tips for going vegan

    Want to try more vegan recipes? Try this vegan blueberry muffin recipe or this vegan ice cream sundae recipe.

    Posted by Alexandra Parren
  • Healthy Vegan Brownie Recipe

    Healthy Brownies Recipe Sundried Protein Vegan Clean Eating

     

    Chocolate brownies are a classic indulgence. Soft, stodgy, and moreish – they can be a difficult craving to ignore! Which is why we're bringing you this fantastic healthy brownie recipe, which is vegan, gluten-free, sugar-free, and even high protein. It's a delicious recipe and will make the perfect post-workout snack without the guilt.

    Ingredients

    • 2 medium, overripe bananas
    • 1 cup smooth peanut butter 
    • 1/3 cup protein powder (use plant-based for vegan)
    • 1/4 cup cocoa powder

    Method

    1. Pre-heat oven to 350F/180C/Gas Mark 4. Line a small square baking dish with parchment paper or grease well. Set aside. 
    2. In a large bowl, mash the banana with a fork and then mix in the peanut butter. Whisk until fully combined.
    3. Stir in the protein powder and cocoa powder with a spoon. Pour the batter into the greased/lined pan.
    4. Bake for 12-20 minutes or until cooked through. 
    5. Cool for at least 10 minutes before cutting.
    6. Cover the leftovers and store in the fridge for up to 3 days. Enjoy cold or at room temperature.

     

     

    Posted by Alexandra Parren