• What Type Of Cardio Should I Do?

    Cardio Training

    Doing cardiovascular exercise is proven to improve your lung capacity, heart health, as well as aiding weight loss. Many people do not enjoy doing cardio and some don't do it at all. But which is the best type for you?

    Low Intensity Steady State (LISS)

    Low Intensity cardio is accessible to most people as you do not need a high level of fitness to begin with and you can easily incorporate it into daily life by going for a walk. Low intensity cardio exercises include things like walking, climbing stairs, or going for a gentle bike ride. These types of exercises are low impact and typically performed at around 40% of your maximum heart rate, which makes them easy to recover from and therefore can be performed on a regular basis. You probably won't break a sweat doing this type of cardio so you could do it on your lunch break at work. Bodybuilders often prefer this type of cardio as it is less likely to break down muscle tissue but can still help you drop body fat.

    Benefits of LISS:

    1. It is low impact so you can still do it if you have a minor injury or have limited mobility.
    2. You won't break a sweat so you can fit it into your daily routine without having to plan around it.
    3. It doesn't break down muscle tissue so you can still improve your strength while dropping body fat.

      High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT)

      High Intensity Interval Training sees you working very near 100% of your maximum effort for short bursts with short rests in between. This type of training can help to improve your VO2 and cardiovascular fitness very quickly and is proven to aid weight loss. This type of cardio is not suitable for those who are pregnant or those who have injuries. You need a fairly high level of fitness to start with otherwise you will end up feeling very sick!

      Benefits of High Intensity Cardio:

      1. Boosts Metabolism for up to 24 hours.
      2. Increases VO2 max.
      3. Shorter workouts are great for those who lack a lot of free time to train.
      4. Increased Lactate Threshold. Your ability to handle increased lactic acid buildup in your muscles increases.

      Do you have to do cardio to burn fat?

      The only way you can lose weight is by eating a calorie deficit. This means burning more calories than you are eating. While you don't need to do cardio to burn fat, it certainly helps! There are so many other benefits to doing cardio other than just weight loss, so it is definitely an important part of a healthy lifestyle. 

      Posted by Alexandra Parren
    1. EHOH - Every Hour On the Hour

      Workout at work keep fit home workout

      EHOH stands for Every Hour On the Hour and is an emerging fitness trend developed to combat the dangers of sitting at work and living a sedentary lifestyle.

      How does EHOH work?

      The average working day is 8 hours long with a one-hour lunch break. EHOH proposes that you split your one-hour lunch break into 3 10-minute breaks and 1 half-hour break so that you can get away from your desk more often and combat the health risks associated with sitting for too long. Although EHOH stands for Every Hour On the Hour, you can take your 10-minute breaks whenever suits you best. It's advisable to take a 10-minute break each hour in the morning and then the longer half-hour break in the afternoon when you need to eat lunch.

      Benefits of EHOH

      We all know exercise is great for your mind and body and the health benefits are almost endless, but exercising during your working day can actually improve your performance at work as well. A study by the Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine found that incorporating just 2.5 hours of exercise per week into the workday led to a noticeable reduction in absences.

      5 Reasons To Do EHOH

      1. If you are more active you are less likely to go sick meaning fewer absences.
      2. Active people have more energy. Regular exercise increases energy throughout the day, meaning more energy to put in good quality work and be productive in the office.
      3. You will have more self-confidence. Confidence is empowering and will encourage you to push yourself and achieve more in your career.
      4. You will inspire your colleagues to become healthier.
      5. Fit people take on more leadership roles because of the many positive benefits of a lifestyle. A fit individual tends to make a good leader.
      Posted by Alexandra Parren
    2. Functional Training

      functional training movement patterns

      Functional training is all about movements not muscles. Instead of focusing on a muscle in isolation, functional training looks at how the muscles work together to improve the way we “function” in everyday movement.

      What is Functional Movement?

      Author, speaker, and pro trainer Nick Tuminello explains what is meant by functional movement. “Many personal trainers define “functional training” as exercises using three-dimensional movements or standing on unstable surfaces. Many strength coaches feel that “functional training” has to do with just getting stronger in the basic lifts. Many physical therapists and corrective exercise-oriented trainers think that “functional training” is about regaining your muscle balance and fundamental movement ability before you begin doing either 3D exercises or the basic lifts.”

      In truth, functional training is a combination of all these skills. Functional training is training to improve for a purpose. What this means is that functional training will differ slightly for every individual, however there are principles of movement which mimic the way the body is built to move, and these tend to apply to almost everyone.

      Functional Movement Patterns

      Exercise, at its very simplest, is just movement. These movements are primal; our bodies are designed to move. There are 7 basic movement patterns, which most exercises will fall into. Practising exercises which develop and master these movement patterns will build functional strength which can be transferred into all other aspects of your life, from sport to daily function. If you watch a child, they will naturally learn these moves as they develop their range of movement.

      Squat

      The squat is one of our most primal movements, we are designed to be able to move in this position, which is why you will see many toddlers playing in a squat.

      Squats

      To complete a squat, your head should remain facing forward to keep your spine in a neutral position and you should sink your weight back into your heels and lower towards the floor. There are many arguments as to how low you should go. Your range of motion will depend on your flexibility, but it can (and should) be worked on.

      Lunge

      The lunge is a single leg exercise, where one leg takes the lead and the second leg bends as it remains stationary. Originally we’d use this movement for functions such as stepping over obstacles or as we threw a spear to catch our dinner. Now the move is popular for building leg strength as well as to improve sports performance.

      When lunging, you should keep your front knee tracking over your foot, but not in front of it. Hold your head high and make sure your back stays straight (try sticking your chest out if your shoulders arch).

      Push

      The push range of movement requires you to move something away from your body, or move your body away from a force, ie the ground. We have two primary pushing movements, the vertical and horizontal push. A vertical push lifts something above your head and a horizontal press pushes it forward.

      The top tip for correcting your push up is to keep your back straight and not let your chest drop; you can do this by squeezing your shoulder blades together. If you can’t keep straight, drop to your knees to make the exercise easier.

      Pushups

      Pushups - Indoors or outdoors. Take them anywhere.

      Pull

      Pulling is the opposite movement to a push, bringing an object towards you. Much like with the push up we have two pulling motions, horizontal and vertical.

      An example of the pull motion is a pull up. If you can’t do a full pull up you can start with negatives and work your way up.

      Twist

      This is where our third plane of motion gets involved and the movements become more functional. Here we involve the transverse plane.

      If you think about lunging down and reaching across your body, or throwing a ball, running, or even walking, most human movement has some element of a rotation involved.

      TRX Oblique Crunch

      TRX oblique crunch

      Bend

      You bend your torso by hinging at the hips. This is one of the most commonly used movements; think of how many times you may bend throughout the day, to open a drawer, pick up your bag, tie your shoes.

      Taking the weight through your hips, glutes, and legs is the key to lifting weight in a bent over position. This is done by keeping your low back in a neutral, to slightly arched position, as you bend over to lift an object off the ground.

      Arch your back and you're prone to all sorts of injuries, in particular a herniated disk. Ouch.

      Gait/Combination

      Walking, jogging, running and sprinting all require a combination of movement patterns which we define as gait. This covers all our movement patterns required to keep the body in motion.

      Running

      Muscle Slings

      In order for our bodies to move in these particular ranges of motion, our muscles have to work together to create movement. Where bodybuilding isolates muscle groups, functional training brings them together in what we call muscle slings.


      Anterior Oblique System:

      External and internal oblique with the opposing leg’s adductors and intervening anterior abdominal fascia.

      Posterior Oblique System:

      The lat and opposing gluteus maximus.

      Deep Longitudinal System:

      Erectors, the innervating fascia and biceps femoris.

      Lateral System:

      Glute medius and minimus and the opposing adductors of the thigh.


      The systems tell us which muscles work together, and help us to analyses how to notice gaps in the sling to develop improved movement.

      Anterior Oblique System

      The obliques help provide stability and mobility in gait. They are both important in providing that initial stability during the stance phase of gait (running etc.) and then contribute to pulling the leg through during the swing phase. This system is important in helping the body create more stability as speed increases in activities such as sprinting, but also as important as the body tries to decelerate during change of direction.

      Example:

      Squat with a diagonal reach

      Posterior Oblique System

      This is most commonly used during gait movements where the glute max of one hip works with the lat of the opposing side to create tension in the thoracolumbar fascia. The action of these muscles along with the fascial system is thought to fight the rotation of the pelvis that would occur during gait as well as store energy to create more efficient movement.

      Deep Longitudinal System

      This system uses both the thoracolumbar fascia and paraspinal system to create kinetic energy above the pelvis, while the biceps femoris acts as a relay between the pelvis and leg. What is also important to note is the relationship between the biceps femoris and anterior tibialis, which creates stability and helps build as well as release kinetic energy to help more efficient movement.

      Lunge with Row

      Lateral System

      The lateral system provides lateral stability. The lateral system is often used to create stability in the pelvis during walking, stepping, etc.

      Squats

      Squats - a pulse-raising exercise you can do anywhere

      Functional Training is training for life

      If you haven’t tried functional movements or training slings, try adding moves which challenge these areas into your routine to improve your training.

      Great tools for developing functional fitness and training in multiple planes of motion using slings are the TRX and Kettlebell training.

      Posted by Alexandra Parren
    3. How To Stay Healthy At Work

      how to stay healthy at work lifestyle

      If you work at a desk job, you probably spend more time at your desk than anywhere else in your life and that comes with its drawbacks. The problem being that we know there is a problem, but sitting is so deeply rooted into office culture, it’s difficult to change it. So how can you stay healthy at work?

      Be smart with your breaks

      Sundried believe that supporting staff health should be part of our healthy company ethos, which is why we created the concept of EHOH. EHOH stands for ‘every hour on the hour’ and is simply the way we break up our long periods of sitting by adding workouts or just stretching our legs whenever an hour passes. The addition of exercise into your working day doesn’t have to cost your staff focus or paid time either.

      A standard office worker will spend their entire 8 hours of work sitting down. Add to this another potential 2 hours each day commuting by car or train and you're spending most of your waking hours sedentary. EHOH proposes we shake up this regime. Instead of having a one-hour lunch break, we suggest breaking the 60 minutes into 6 10-minute breaks at hourly intervals throughout the day. This can help to alleviate back ache and other issues associated with long periods of sitting at a desk.

      workout at work healthy coffee workspace office

      Research supports working out at work

      Research published in the Journal of Workplace Health Management by the University of Bristol found that employees who enjoyed a workout before going to work or exercised during lunch breaks - were better equipped to handle whatever the day threw at them.

      It also found that people's general mood improved on days of exercise but they became more anxious on days without exercise.

      The research, published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management, is the first of it's kind to prove that exercise during work hours has mental, as well as physical benefits. Of those involved with the research, seventy two per cent reported improvements in time management on exercise days compared to non-exercise days, seventy nine per cent said mental and interpersonal performance was better on days they exercised and seventy four per cent said they managed their workload better.

      A study by the Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine found that incorporating just 2.5 hours of exercise per week into the workday led to a noticeable reduction in absences.

      So a happier more time efficient, focused workforce who get more work done can be achieved just by encouraging exercise at work.

      But what about all the cakes and office snacking…

      Working out at work can make you hungrier yes, but typically eating at the desk is brought on by boredom and not physical hunger. Therefore having the mental stimulation each hour of a short workout can help to encourage you to eat less and stay more focused.

      Working out at work shouldn’t be a matter of frantically doing dips off your desk every time the boss leaves the room, exercise should be a priority for employers. Fit and healthy staff also means less sick days.

      Workout at work to be all day active

      Research has shown that even those who exercise after work are at risk of severe health issues if they continue to sit for the rest of the day.

      Dr. David Alter, a heart expert from the University of Toronto and senior scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute found that sitting too much—even among people who exercise regularly—led to higher rates of hospitalisation, heart disease and cancer and even premature death.

      The researchers looked at 47 studies that asked people how much time they spent sitting and exercising, as well as rates of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and death from any cause. The more hours people in the studies spent sedentary—like watching TV or sitting behind a desk—the higher their risk of all of these negative outcomes. Heavy sitters showed a 90% higher risk of developing diabetes than those who sat less, an 18% higher chance of dying of heart disease or cancer, and 24% greater odds of dying from any cause. These rates were the average among people who both exercised regularly and those who did not.

      The Sundried collection has been developed to encourage all day activity, where exercise is intrinsic. From working in the office to cycling to meetings our activewear is smart and functional.

      Walking meetings

      It doesn’t have to stop at EHOH either, a pilot study on walking meetings conducted at the University of Miami discovered that office workers who swapped one seated meeting a week for a walking meeting added an extra 10 minutes of physical activity easily into their regular routine.

      The research saw 17 employee’s from the university conduct one of their 30-60 minute meetings whilst walking. They were encouraged to bring water, sunblock and other necessities.

      On average their moderate - intense physical activity increases as a result, from 107 weekly minutes to 117 weekly minutes by the third week following the new protocol.

      The researchers also noted that whilst the walking meetings were not large calorie burners, what they did do was significantly improve the employees moods by breaking up sedentary spells.

      "The data collected from this pilot study suggest that walking meetings were not only well accepted by our sample of workers but were easy to implement and feasible to conduct," Alberto Caban-Martinez and his team wrote in Preventing Chronic Disease, published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      We need to create a shift in office norms, instead of bringing in a cake on your birthday, why not have the birthday burpees ? Earn that cake! All it takes is one office worker to start EHOH and eventually the other’s will follow (even if they don’t want to, eventually the guilt will get to them)!

      A shift in office culture has to start somewhere, so join us and get your office moving with EHOH and workout at work.

      Posted by Alexandra Parren
    4. Flat Stomach Abs Workout

      Flat Stomach Core Abs Workout Sundried

      It can be very easy to neglect your abdominal muscles when planning a workout. Having a strong core is crucial to being fit, strong, and healthy so follow Sundried's flat stomach abs workout and see the results for yourself!

      How to get a flat stomach

      Unfortunately, doing endless crunches won't get you a flat stomach. You can't 'spot reduce' an area, which means you can't just target your tummy by doing ab exercises and expect it to lose weight. By following a healthy, balanced diet, drinking enough water, and getting enough sleep, you will be well on your way to getting a flat stomach. Adding a great core workout like this one into your weekly routine will then help to tone and strengthen the area to help enhance the appearance of your abs. 

      Exercises for a flat stomach

      There are lots of core exercises out there, so we have consolidated all the best ones to give you a fantastic workout routine that you can do anywhere. Using resistance like you'd find on a gym machine will certainly get you good results, but this bodyweight workout can be done at home or outdoors so it is more accessible to everyone.

      Slim tummy abs workout

      Roll Back Mountain Climbers

      Start by lying on your back and bring your knees into your chest. Rock back onto your shoulders and use the momentum of your movement to roll forward. Place your hands in front of you and then jump your feet back into a plank. From here complete 4 mountain climbers, bringing your knees in towards your hands. Then lift your hands off the ground and roll back. That’s one rep. Go for 10 reps.

      Plank Split Squat Thrusts

      Get into a press up position keeping your hands directly underneath your shoulders and your body in a straight line. Jump your legs forward towards your hands, splitting your legs so a foot lands by either hand. Jump your feet back to meet in your plank position. Complete 10 reps.

      Oblique Plank Pull Throughs

      Lie on your side and prop yourself up on your forearm, keeping it underneath your shoulder. Lift your hip so you are in a side plank position. Reach up over your head extending your arm out straight and then sweep it down through the gap between your stomach and the floor, keeping your hips lifted at all times. Complete 10 on each side with 30 seconds rest between each.

      V-Sit

      This is the exercise shown in the image above. Start seated with your back straight and knees slightly bent, lean back until you feel your abdominal muscles engage. When you're ready, extend your legs out straight in front of you and raise your arms above your head. You may well feel your body shudder and shake, so try to control your abs as much as possible. Hold this position for as long as you can.

      Walk The Plank

      Doing the plank just got even harder! Take up a plank position, and then lift yourself up into a press up position (straight arms) one hand at a time. Then lower yourself back down. Repeat this for 30 seconds and feel the burn!

       

       

      Posted by Alexandra Parren