cycling mountain everesting uphill climb bike

The concept of Everesting is wickedly simple: find a hill anywhere in the world and cycle up and down it repeatedly until you have achieved a total climb of 8,848m - the height of Mount Everest.

The ride has to be done in one activity with no sleep, but has no time limit. 2,283 people so far have completed an Everesting in a total of 73 different countries. 

The Rules of Everesting 

It does not matter how long the ride takes, but it must be ridden in one attempt with no sleeping in between, however toilet and meal breaks are allowed. You can break for as long or as little as you like, but It's important to note that break times add up quickly and can significantly increase your elapsed time.

An exception to the no-sleep requirement is if you are completing multiple Everestings in one activity. In this instance, the first Everesting must still be completed with no sleep, however an allowance for up to 2 hours for each ‘subsequent’ Everesting exists. This 2 hour allowance is a total, so it can be taken as 1x 2hr sleep, 2x 1hr sleeps, 4x 30min sleeps etc. 

Rides can be of any length, on any hill, mountain, driveway or bridge. Essentially anything that has a vertical gain can be used to complete an Everesting.

Rides must only focus on one hill or mountain per ride, so you can’t base yourself in one location and ride multiple hills. You cannot ride different routes on the same mountain. If there are 4 routes, that means there are 4 possible ‘everestings’ (think of it like the North and South face of Everest).

Climbing Everesting Mount Everest Competition Cycling Ride Bike

Rides cannot be loops. The descent must be via the same road unless you are prevented from doing so (e.g. one-way street or one-way trail). This is to prevent kinetic gain sometimes afforded by a loop, or an ‘easier’ descent.

Rides must be full ascents each time (Strava segments or the accepted ‘traditional’ climbing route will generally be the best guide for this. You can’t commit to a combination of full and half laps). Acceptable is a shorter segment of a climb if it is recognised in its own right. 

Each repeat must be ridden up and down (i.e. you can’t get driven down each time). You also need to keep your device recording the whole time.

No section of the ride can be walked. This is a cycling challenge.

cycling uphill road bike mountain climb

High Rouleurs Society

If the mood strikes, you may feel compelled to continue your ride until you hit the elusive 10,000m of elevation gain in a single ride. If you complete this, you will be inducted into the High Rouleurs Society. 

There are two ways to join the High Rouleurs Society: The Journey or The Limit.

THE LIMIT: One single unbroken ride of more than 10,000m vertical. No time restriction, no distance requirement, no sleep allowed. This approach is all about finding the boundaries of what is possible in a single ride. If you happen to complete an everesting as part of your Limit ride then this will count in both halls of fame.

THE JOURNEY: More than 10,000m vertical in less than 36 hours, with a minimum of 400km. Sleep is allowed (while the clock is ticking), and in fact it should form part of your strategy! This approach is all about the joy of plotting something epic and unusual. With the ability to start the two days in different locations you should be getting creative with what can be achieved.

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